Thursday, July 9, 2009

Drying Hydration Systems Quickly

This is blast from the past but still a good tip. While I made this video a long time ago, to this day, I dry my Platypuses (Platpus, Platypi?) using this simple technique after every trip. It's definitely not the best video I've made but enjoy (or "endure" as the case may be).



I forgot to mention in the video that you can also hook up your hydration tube to the aquarium pump nozzle (one of the trickiest components to dry out quickly). What's your method for drying out hydration bladders, tubes, water bottles, etc. What tricks do you have up your sleeve?
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15 comments:

hakrjak said...

No tricks... I generally leave mine hanging over the staircase for weeks until my better half yells at me to put it away... It always still has some water in it at this point, but I rinse it out well before the next hike! haha ;)

hakrjak said...

No tricks... I generally leave mine hanging over the staircase for weeks until my better half yells at me to put it away... It always still has some water in it at this point, but I rinse it out well before the next hike! haha ;)

Mac E said...

I normally just let it air dry and use plastic golf balls to keep the sides apart.

http://maceachain.blogspot.com/2009/01/drying-hydration-pack-bladder.html

Scotty said...

A cheaper if a bit slower method is to find an existing source of circulating air (an open window or furnace/AC vent) and hang it upside down with the cap off and something inside to keep the bag open. I've used the tubing itself for this but part of a plastic coathanger works fine.

As far as the tube goes, I use the drinking tube to inflate the bag and clear out the tube, then am sure to flush it out well before the next use. So far so good.

Jason Klass said...

Scotty,
I'm glad you mentioned "inflating" the bag first. That's important because if you don't, there will always be those little corners of the bag that water sneaks into. I didn't mention it in the video but I usually just blow into the bag and kind of squeeze it on the sides to expand it.

Jason Klass said...

Mac,
Golf balls? So you must be using a wide-mouth bladder like a Nalgene or something, right? Golf balls wouldn't fit into a Platypus or Evernew narrow mouth bladder.

Some old guy said...

I use four "big slam"-type 1-liter soda/water bottles with the bigger spouts. I rinse them out with bleach water, then rinse that out, shake out as much water as I can and sit them at a bit of an angle spout-down on a bit of evazote to dry for a week, then cap 'em and put 'em away.

Robin said...

I have a plasic coat hanger I cut the bottem cross bar in the middle and can stick two Platipus's on it and hang in the sun.

Works great.
robin
BackpackBaseCamp Blog

Mac E said...

Jason I previously used the Camelbak Un-Bottle but now use a Source Widepac, both easily take a plastic golf ball.

Some old guy said...

> I dry my Platypuses (Platpus,
> Platypi?)

Plural of Platypus = Platyplus?

Izzy G. said...

I've actually been doing this recently and just now noticed your post, Jason! Lol. I was like "Maybe this will work."

robb said...

I've been doing this for years with no ill effect to my camelbak, but I put mine in the freezer when I get back. I make sure it's pretty much empty and in the freezer it goes. Works out great for me.

Hendrik M said...

Plural of Platypus is Platypuses.

I just let them dry in the cupboard with all the other dishes. Works always and I don't need to use electricity.

mzen said...

Jason,

I use your method all the time. It works very well. You do have to shake the bag to get the water stuck in the seams.

I also use it to dry the in-line filters too.

mzen

Kaarle Almila said...

This blog has relly helped me and other people.


Water Bladder For Backpack