Friday, November 27, 2009

Gear Talk Thru Hike Challenge

Today, a reader emailed me with a challenge. He'd like to see a discussion about the best gear list for a thru-hike of the AT that takes advantages of resupply. So what have you got? You don't have to post a full gear list. Let's just focus on the biggies: packs, shelters, sleeping bags, hiking shoes, sleeping pad, clothing, ect. Also, he's willing to go without a stove. So what about some suggestions for good ready-to-eat food along the way?
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13 comments:

Joseph said...

Gear selected for my hike in March 2010. Pack - ULA Conduit, Quilt - GoLite Ultra 20, Pad - Bozeman Mountain Works Torso Pad, Tent - Gossamer Gear The One, Shoes - Merrill Moab Ventilators with Sole inserts, Gaiters - Simblissity Scree Gaiters, Icebreaker Wool Shirt, Montbell Thremowrap Panta and Jacket, Golite Virga Rain Jacket and Reed Rain ... See MorePants, Wightenberry Mills Merino Wool Socks, GoLite Strider Shorts and Exofficio Treking Pants, REI nylon cap.

I will carry cooking gear but a couple of years ago I found myself on the AT without a stove so here is what I ate. Tuna and crakers, Cliff Bars and Peanut Butter, Cheese, Crakers and Pepperonni. A really good bar if you can find them are the ProBars. But they are not widely distributed on the east coast.

the Reluctant Scouter said...

Sleeping bag -- Montbell Down Hugger #3. Only 23 ounces and packs very small. Base sleeping bag I've ever owned.

Vailant said...

Joseph...

You are leaving March 2010? Is that to avoid anticipated crowding on the trail in April?

Have you used "The One" on previous trips?

Rovious said...

I have a short video of the gear that I take on my section hikes on the AT and what I will be using when I do my thru hike. (There are a few luxury items that I wouldn't carry on a thru hike though as you will easily identify).

Rovious.blogspot.com

hobohiker said...

Foodwise, I'd look at Andy Skurka's food lists on his website. He minimizes cooking w/ hot water soak only dinners like instant mash potatoes(good w/ tortillas), cous cous, angel hair pasta, instant refried beans. Personally, I'd at least pack a cat can stove. A hot meal can be a lifesaver, especially early on when the weather is cold.

I'd go to Whole Foods, etc. and buy as many different flavors of bar I could get my hands on. The Balance Bars are great for the vitamin content.(Sweet and Salty almond Balance is scrumptious) You can order boxes of bars online for pretty reasonable too, especially when you find the places w/ free shipping like Drugstore.com. Hard Cheese like parmesan is a good salty, caloric item that will keep for days at room temp. Measuring your food and calories by day and keeping everything organized will help with managing your food reserves and not running out or having too much. Keep a good balance of salt and sweet. Too much sweet can get old quick, plus you need some salt to minimize the effects of dehydration.

Joseph said...

Vailant asked...
Joseph...

You are leaving March 2010? Is that to avoid anticipated crowding on the trail in April?

The choosen date is more about weather than crowds. I'm hoping we are able be in New England by summer and miss a lot of the heat in the Mid-Atlantic states. As far a the crowds this is unfortunately the beginning of the peak.

Have you used "The One" on previous trips?
No I normally tarp camp or I also have an older Luna Solo with the velcro strip on the flap. The waterproofing is about shot so I'm looking at the One as a replacement. Since it will weigh about the same as my tarp and bivey it will be an even trade on weight plus bug protection as well as keep me from laying dirctly in the snow slush I am expecting to encounter.

You can e-mail me direct at jjacaruso@rocketmail.com

Lance Milks said...

Hey Joe,

I heard of your upcomming thru-hike. I will be on the Bartram Trail at that time. I wish you happy trails and light packs.

Lance

sage said...

I'm getting envious reading on all these lightweight outfits--I finished the AT in 1988 (1300 miles was in 87, the rest were on week or 2 week trips). I used an old Kelty D-4 pack with an extension bar, a tarp, a kelty 2.5 pound, 30 degree bag. I had an MSR multi-fuel stove that was great because I could buy gas at a filling station, but sounded like the space shuttle taking off, carried, carried on pot, water purifying tablets and no pump and always a book and a journal.

My camera was also heavy and in an attempt to go lighter, I compromised and picked up a light weight 40 mm lens and carried it along with a 100 mm with a UV filter on one lens and a polarizer on another (later, on hikes in the West, I'd carry a 28 and a 100). Today I'd take a Olympus waterproof digital camera. Although the polarizer is more of a necessity out west, it was only valuable on the AT in the White Mts and on Katadhin

Marty said...

a good Tent Hammock... I use a Clark and love it!

JJ said...

Take a MiniAtomic, small, light, and Hot.
There is Always room for a lightweight alcohol stove!

Emmett said...

I tentatively agree with the hammock suggestion. I did the Long Trail last year with a Contrail, and I found that New England has a lot of both rocks and trees. Both make a tent/tarp more difficult, and a hammock more reasonable.

That said, I'm not a great hammock sleeper. I'll hike the extra miles to find some flat and soft ground.

dougquinn said...

I agree a hammock is absolutely necessary for that hike! depending on what time of the year your going, just make sure you bring some Gaiters
because without them it gets a little hairy.

Felcy said...

Great thoughts you got there, believe I may possibly try just some of it throughout my daily life.



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