Monday, September 13, 2010

The Mora Clipper - A Good Backpackng Knife

In my ongoing quest to find the ultimate fixed-blade backpacking knife that is sturdy, lightweight, and cheap, I recently got a Mora Clipper 840 on eBay for a steal.  Compared to the Mora Classic knife I recently reviewed, I find this to be a better knife for about the same money.



While the Mora Classic certainly has its charm with the wooden handle, I find the non-slip grip of the Clipper to be more practical.  It has a similar carbon steel blade that is easier to sharpen in the field with a smooth river stone (as well as with a proper sharpening stone) thanks to the Scandinavian grind, but with a more modern handle that includes a finger guard.  Like the Classic, the sheath leaves a little to be desired but it's still a great value for the price. Unlike the patina I tried to force upon my Classic Mora with mustard, I think I will let this one acquire a natural patina and see how it goes.  Any other Clipper users out there?

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19 comments:

Simon said...

The Mora Clipper is a great knife for the price. It can blunt easily if sharpened flat (it comes with a micro secondary bevel) as the edge can roll but it is easy enough to maintain. Top tip is to square off the spine so that it can be used to strike sparks off a ferrocerium rod. Nice and light too!

J said...

I've been using the Clipper since April of this year, great knife for the price. My reason for purchasing this model was the handle, good grip when wet.

Gustav Boström said...

The Mora Clipper is pretty much a standard knife in Sweden. Here it costs around 10$ I think. Mainly it is used by carpenters and such, but it really is a great outdoors-knife. I haven't found any better knife for the price either, although the sheath is pretty bad I agree. I don't trust it. One day I will make a sheath myself. The knife is worth it.

Brian said...

I agree that Mora knives are an amazing value and are very capable knives for a wide range of uses. I recent did a detailed review of my KJ Eriksson Mora Carbon Knife #711 ($12) compared to two other much more expensive knives; my Fallkniven F1 and my SOG Seal Pup M37. After all was said and done the Mora 711 came out on top in nearly every category and surprised even me! Great knives for beginners and experts, hard to go wrong for under $15.

stick13 said...

Nice. As far as function, I agree wtih you that the grip is better on the Clipper, but then the classic is just cool... Anyway. Did you ever replace the sheath on your classic Mora?

stick13 said...

Nice. As far as function, I agree with you that the grip is better on the Clipper, but then the classic is just cool... Anyway. Did you ever replace the sheath on your classic Mora?

Desert Dog said...

You must have been reading my mind with this review. I just ordered two of these last week, a Clipper & the Bushcraft Triflex. Can't wait to put them through the paces.

Tom C. said...

I've made a few leather sheaths for my Moras using the instructions shown at: http://bensbackwoods.blogspot.com , under the "Crafts" section. About half-way down the page it shows how to use the original plastic sheath of a Clipper as a liner for a cool leather one.

Simon said...

One thing in favour of the plastic sheath is that is more easily cleaned than leather sheaths. This can prove to be important if you are using your knife for everything, including food prep.

CBS said...

So my question to myself is do I bring a knife like the Mora Clipper or just bring a micro leatherman. Usually I opt for a micro leatherman, which suits all needs. But, there are times when I do opt for a knife, in which I bring a Tusa scuba knife. I bring a scuba knife for these reasons. Its light, no slip handle, the blade is a small 2.5 inches, has a flat head for prying things and has a groove for cutting rope. The sheath locks the knife in place, and you can either clip it or hang it around your neck. So I can scuba dive and jump out of the water and start hiking.

Marty said...

Glad you tried the clipper. I've been using mine for about 20 years. I don't carry mine around my neck, but I have zip tied the plastic sheath to my backpack... Very handy...

Matt said...

As Desert Dog mentioned...go with the Mora BushCraft Triflex model 2080. It costs about $10 more. Nicer sheath Plus a better grip profile on the handle.

Desert Dog said...

My Moras came a couple of days ago. The Bushcraft Triflex definitely has a better grip profile than the Clipper and a better sheath.

For CBS, I prefer fixed blades over folders because they are easier to clean. I typically use the same knife for everything and it is hard to get dirt and food out of all of the nooks & seams of a folder. Also, folding knives (even locking blades) have a nasty habit of closing on fingers at the worst possible time.

Anonymous said...

For handles I definitely find the Clipper much better than the bushcraft Triflex.
I guess it's a matter of hand size.
As for the sheaths, I also find the Triflex to give a more secure grip.
/ Karl

Anonymous said...

check out the Mora Classic Nr 612, it might be the "perfect" knife for you.

J.Richmore said...

Try this gerber knives folding collection. They are very durable and easy to pack.

Billy said...

I have a collection of knives including buck knife, kershaw knife, gerber knife and a cold steel knife. I think I should try and get a Mora Clipper as well. I would love to experience what the new handle can offer.

Romilda Gareth said...

Thanks

Alice Taylor said...

Loving the size and the design of the non-slip handle. It seems like it is well balanced and easy to use. If you are like me and simply love the backpacking knives, then you will also love the article I am about to recommend ;) Found it on the web the other day, and it talks about what to look for when buying a knive and also offers reviews of some of the best models on the market. You can take a look, here: http://hikingmastery.com/top-pick/best-backpacking-knife.html