Tuesday, March 8, 2011

DIY Traction for Hiking Boots


The Spring hiking season is coming and I've been thinking a lot lately about traction options.  Spring hiking here in Colorado often means slippery, muddy trails with patches of ice and snow.  There usually isn't enough snow to warrant snowshoes or enough ice to warrant big, heavy crampons but most ordinary hiking boots just don't cut it.  I've used Yax Trax in the past and they work great but was wondering what other options are out there that are lighter.  I was also looking for something that you don't have to put on and take off.  Grip Studs seem to be a good alternative.


Grip Studs look like little cleats you would find on a golf shoe.  You can install them yourself with a special tool and pattern guide that is included.  They're great for trails with mixed surfaces and bite into with a nice, solid grip.  In case you're wondering, they are removable so you can take them off in the summer when the trails dry out.  I haven't done it enough to notice yet but I imagine you can only install and remove them so many times in the same place before the hole is stripped (I suppose you could alternate the location if you think you'll be removing them often).  

For those of you looking for a simple "install and forget" traction solution, Grip Studs might be the way to go.  Oh, and if you're an angler, they work great on wading boots too!  Click here for more info.




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10 comments:

motoroz said...

Very interesting. I think I will try that.

Paul said...

I have a friend who wears insulated rubber boots in winter a lot. I will definately recommend them.

theargosgirlchronicles said...

I'm like Paul's friend - I wear insulated rubber boots in the winter a lot! I'm definitely going to check this out because I have troubles with traction at the best of times.

Anonymous said...

I'd like to hear from people who use sheet metal screws before investing $30. Screws aren't as durable, but much, much cheaper. Anybody know how well the screws hold up?

ladyheart said...

Appropriate footwear are the most important element against pain. Choosing the right shoes avoids your feet to become overused, overstretched, or inflamed.
nike running shoes

JJP said...

FYI, having hobnails on boots will cause you to skate like you're on ice if you ever step on hard linoleum or tile or the like, and tear floors up pretty bad. Just throwing that out there.

Jason Klass said...

JJP-
LOL, if you're hiking on tile, you made a wrong turn somewhere!

Bob said...

Yes, anonymous, I've used sheet metal screws in my soles for winter ice traction. They work very well, are cheap, and not a single screw head has broken off.

Karl Gottshalk said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Karl Gottshalk said...

re: sheet metal screws. Our local outdoors carries "stabilicers replacement cleats" for the stabilicer brand of cleats. They are just carbide hex head sheet metal screws. A pack of about 20 was less than $5. They are available on Amazon. I put them in my winter hiking boots 2 years ago. No breakage, none have fallen out. Very effective.